More Exploration of the Snake River Canyon.

The day after hiking the Snake River Trail, which goes upstream, we bushwacked (hiked without a trail, watching, of course, diligently for rattlesnakes) downstream for a couple of miles.

The Oregon Side.

Rafters on the Snake River.

We found what looked like an old wagon road along the cliffs. The road, obviously constructed many many years ago, was cut into the cliff for a few hundred yards and just ends at rather serious dropoff. You can just see it, curving around the cliff in the middle right side of the picture above. Who knows? We never could figure out WHY someone would want to cut a road along that Cliff, but it was a nice hike with some great views of the river and the canyon itself.

Looking Up River.

Looking down on dune like structures on the Oregon Side.

Mulberry Tree.

Gambel’s Quail.

A healthy young buck, still in velvet.

Pittsburg Landing is a gorgeous campground but after 4 days of rising temperatures, heading back to the Hell’s Canyon normal, we needed to head south, around the bottom of the canyon, into the Ponderosa Forests of Oregon.

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Sharing our love of America's Natural Wonders